Molded Blackberry Granita with Sugared Mint Leaves and Raspberries

Blackberries and raspberries together are like divine intervention on the taste buds, perking them back to life after a sating repast. A granita is a dessert ice  with a decidedly crystalline, not smooth, texture. It’s one of the easiest frozen desserts to make, requiring no ice cream maker or intermittent beating as it freezes. The … Continue reading Molded Blackberry Granita with Sugared Mint Leaves and Raspberries

Chocolate Frozen Yogurt with Sun-Dried Apricot Almond Spoon Sweet and Toasted Almonds

Homemade frozen yogurt, unrelated to the commercial ones except in name, can be an unctuous, deeply-flavored concoction, smooth and creamy or full of chunks (see Strawberry Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt). One of the things I love most, frozen yogurts don’t require an ice cream maker, just a couple of turns in and out of the freezer … Continue reading Chocolate Frozen Yogurt with Sun-Dried Apricot Almond Spoon Sweet and Toasted Almonds

Rhubarb Strawberry Frozen Yogurt and Crystallized Orange Peel with Rosewater

Colorado Rocky Mountain rhubarb straight from the source

After the rhubarb chutney (see my previous post, July 25, 2011), I was looking for the best, most perfect, and fun way to use what was left of my gift of wild Colorado mountain rhubarb. As chance would have it, my cousin Karen Jenanyan and I, along with others at an al fresco lunch in our backyard, were discussing how much we love making yogurt from our generations-old starter and how we take pride in carrying and passing along the baton of  Armenian yogurt making. Karen had been experimenting with making yogurt with fruit on the bottom, like the small containers you find in grocery stores. We got to, how’s about some fruity frozen yogurt, which you don’t much find in grocery stores? Continue reading “Rhubarb Strawberry Frozen Yogurt and Crystallized Orange Peel with Rosewater”

Olive Oil Cumin Seed Ice Cream with Mango Slices

Many years ago, as I entered the spice bazaar in Casablanca, the scent of cumin provided a Proustian moment for me. I was young and it was my first excursion to Europe, via Yugoslavian freighter, a “hip” and

Generally, I use ground cumin for soups, stews, and curries, but for ice cream I opt for whole seeds, toasting them as in Indian and Mexican cooking. I then include them whole in the custard. That way, they lend the full benefit of their spice to the cold mix and also make a pleasing small crunch as you eat the ice cream.

“cheap” way to travel at the time (1967). Of all the beautiful and fragrant offerings, cumin wafted most aromatic, rising above the others and filling the street with its perfume, one I had not known until then. I continued delighting in its scent, literally, as I traveled around with a stash of cumin in my suitcase. To this day, cumin scents my kitchen as I prepare dishes for casual family meals and develop recipes for my cookbooks.

Recently, passing by an enticing  display of multi-hued mangoes, Continue reading “Olive Oil Cumin Seed Ice Cream with Mango Slices”

Figs and Newtons

About the figs part: I have a bountiful tree of them in my backyard. It provides me fruit aplenty, enough for grilling fresh, drying for later, and making fig marmalade. I especially like the marmalade use because it can be stored in the frig and remain “fresh” for months. About the Newton part. This name … Continue reading Figs and Newtons